Sonoma County Farm Bureau

Family Farmers Alliance a PAC of the Sonoma County Farm Bureau recommends the following candidates and positions for the November 8th general election.

Voter Guide

Farming and Ranching is one of the largest and storied North Bay industries and is a catalyst for business success and economic vitality in the region. Sonoma County Farm Bureau is an authority representing and uniting the county’s nearly one billion dollar agriculture and farming industry – with membership that extends to wine grape growers; dairy, beef and other livestock farmers; and hay, grain and other crop and produce growers.

Sonoma County Farm Bureau and California Farm Bureau Voter Guide

Through that charge, the Family Farmers Alliance a PAC of the Sonoma County Farm Bureau recommends the following candidates and positions for the November 8th general election.

Download: SCFB Voter Guide Nov. 8th.pdf


Complete list of Endorsed Candidates

Thompson

Lynda Hopkins,
Sonoma County Supervisor,
Fifth District

www.lyndaforsupervisor.com



Levine

Bill Dodd,
Third District, State Senate

www.billdodd.com



Levine

Jim Wood,
Second District, State Assembly

www.jim-wood.com



Levine

Marc Levine,
Tenth District, State Assembly

www.marclevine.org



Levine

Mike Thompson,
5th District, U.S. Congress

www.mikethompsonforcongress.com


Complete list of Measures

Measure J – Sonoma County Regional Parks and Water Quality Improvement

Sonoma County Farm Bureau Opposes Measure J because it raises taxes on the rural residents of Sonoma County, those who are least likely to use the park system. Measure J will cost rural taxpayers an estimated $9.5 million annually. Forcing residents who purchase goods and services in the county’s unincorporated area to pay an additional half-cent sales tax will make it more difficult for farmers and ranchers to make a living. Sonoma County’s economy relies on a robust and profitable agriculture industry. With 50 parks and trails to maintain the Regional Park System, Sonoma County should further develop its user based fee structure to accommodate the expansion and renovation plans, not add additional taxes to rural residents.

Measure K – Community Separators

Sonoma County Farm Bureau Supports Measure K
as policy that sustains open space and the viability of family farms by maintaining agricultural and existing land use zoning helping to preserve agricultural land, maintain community identities and contain urban sprawl. This complements municipal urban growth boundaries that safeguard adjacent unincorporated and undeveloped lands. All agricultural operations are allowed in community separators, including farmworker housing. The ballot measure extends the policy for another 20 years until December 31, 2036.

Measure L – Sonoma County Tourist Tax

Sonoma County Farm Bureau Supports Measure L
and the efforts of the County Board of Supervisors to increase the Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT) from 9% to 12%. This revenue stream is paid only by guests staying overnight at lodging facilities within the unincorporated areas of the county and brings the rate in line with many neighboring cities and counties.

Measure M – Transgenic Contamination Prevention Ordinance

Sonoma County Farm Bureau Opposes Measure M.  Ten years ago the Family Farmers Alliance worked extremely hard to defeat a similar measure by the same name.  Now it is back again. Farmers and ranchers need to have the most advanced agriculture technologies available to produce food for the ever growing population.  By excluding current and future advances in biotechnology, this proposal will place local family farmers and ranchers at a disadvantage. Reputable scientists have proven there are no health risks from consuming foods made with biotechnology. Give farmers the ability to choose which technology they use today and into the future.

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Family Farmers Alliance and SCFB took No Position of the following

No position – Measure C – Cotati-Rohnert Park Unified School District
No position – Measure D – Healdsburg Unified School District
No position – Measure E – Sonoma Valley Unified School District
No position – Measure F – Windsor Unified School District
No position – Measure G – Guerneville School District
No position – Measure H – Rincon Valley Union School District
No position – Measure I – Wilmar Union School District
No Position – Measure N – Santa Rosa City Services Measure
No Position – Measure O – City of Santa Rosa Public Safety Spending Levels
No Position – Measure P – City of Cloverdale Cannabis Business Tax
No Position – Measure Q – City of Cotati Urban Growth Boundary
No Position – Measure R – Healdsburg Housing Measure
No Position – Measure S – Healdsburg Transient Occupancy Tax
No Position – Measure T – Healdsburg Water Fluoridation
No Position – Measure U – Sonoma Quality of Life extension of .5 cents Sales Tax
No Position – Measure V – Sonoma Ban of Gas Leaf Blowers
No Position – Measure W – Sonoma Expansion of Smoking Ordinance
No Position – Measure X – School Facility Improvement District 1
No Position – Measure Y – Sonoma County Library Sales Tax

California Farm Bureau Federation Voter Guide

Proposition 51 – School Construction Bond

Provides $9 billion in general obligation bonds for school construction and modernization, allowing for developers to continue using schools to encourage development in agricultural zones.


Proposition 52 – State Fees on Hospitals

Extends an existing charge on most private hospitals that ensures federal Medi-Cal matching funds for providing hospital services to low-income Californians.


Proposition 53 – Revenue Bonds

Requires a statewide vote on projects funded by revenue bonds of $2 billion or more that, though well intended, could prevent development of new water storage facilities and transportation projects.


Proposition 54 – Legislation and Proceedings

Requires legislation be in print or available online at least 72 hours prior to voting and that all open legislative proceedings be accessible for viewing and sharing online.


Proposition 55 – Income Tax Extensions

Extends the Proposition 30 “temporary” income tax increases on high-income earners to fund education and health-care programs, perpetuating the ballot-box budgeting that continually places the budget in need of additional revenue.


Proposition 56 – Cigarette Tax

Increases the state excise tax on cigarettes, other tobacco products and e-cigarettes, primarily to fund health care for low-income Californians.


Proposition 57 – Criminal Sentences

Allows for an increased number of violent, career criminals to be eligible for parole consideration.



Proposition 58 – English Language Education

Provides public schools the ability to choose how to teach English-language learners.



Proposition 59 – Campaign Finance Advisory Question

Advises elected officials to amend the First Amendment to prevent corporations from their right to spend money on political activities, a form of free speech protected by the Constitution.


Proposition 60 – Adult Films

Requires additional workplace health and safety requirements for the adult film industry, including a private right of action for enforcement.



Proposition 61 – State Prescription Drug Purchases

Prohibits state agencies from paying more for any prescription drug than the lowest price paid by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs for the same drug.


Proposition 62 – Death Penalty Repeal

Repeals the death penalty, changing the most serious penalty available to life without parole, and allows for the resentencing of offenders currently under a sentence of death.


Proposition 63 – Gun Control & Ammunition Sales

Burdens law-abiding citizens by increasing the regulations on ammunition sales.



Proposition 64 – Marijuana Legalization

Legalizes the recreational use of marijuana while also permanently locking in funding at historically high levels for the departments of Fish & Wildlife and Parks & Recreation, and establishes a labeling requirement for marijuana, marijuana products and the agricultural products used for making edibles.


Proposition 65 – Single-Use Bag Fees

Requires that fees from the sale of carry-out bags, resulting from any statewide ban, be placed in a special fund administered by the Wildlife Conservation Board.


Proposition 66 – Death Penalty Procedures

Changes the court proceeding to speed the death penalty appeals process.



Proposition 67 – Referendum to Overturn

Single-Use Bag Ban A “yes” vote allows for a statewide ban on singleuse bags to take effect. A “no” vote would allow for individual jurisdictions to implement their own laws.